Festivities of Natural Annual Events Around The World: Australis Equilux (Equal Length of Night and Day Globally)

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September 19, 2014 by Rua Lupa

Solterrestriale Vocabulum (Solar-Earth Terms) Brief

What is Seasonally Occurring

The earth’s current point in orbit places it’s orientation with the equator at a 90° toward the sun, making the sun’s rays hit the two hemispheres equally causing equal lengths of day and night worldwide. At noon along the equatorial line virtually no shadows will be cast. Globally on this day, the point where the horizon crosses the sun’s disk is due east and west. Making it a good time to figure out landmarks that aid in direction throughout the year or building projects that are reliant on the sun’s rays.

In Borealis the days are getting shorter, seeing the earth’s daily turning view of the sun lower on the southern horizon; for Australis the days are getting longer with the daily turning view of the sun becoming higher along the north horizon; The equator will be seeing the daily turning view of the sun overhead then further south for the next six months.

(Altered Image of Earth in Equinox) Original Image by Przemyslaw “Blueshade” Idzkiewicz, used under Creative Commons.

In Borealis, leaves are beginning turn colours and fall, and wildlife are preparing for winter or migrating. Harvest is in full swing, near completion or done depending on crops, weather and climate.

For the Tropics, this is when the Tropical Rain Belt is over the equator again. Coming from the Borealis Sol Axis and moving toward the Australis Sol Axis.

In Australis the days have gotten longer and now spring has arrived. Migrations are moving southward, beginning the avian mating season. The dry season is nearing an end with the imminent arrival of the tropical rain belt.

GlobalConditions_Australis-Equilux(GIF)

Original Images by PZmaps, used under Creative Commons.

 

Seasonal Customs

Borealis is celebrating the harvest, where feasts and giving of thanks for a good harvest is a common theme. Apples make up much of the seasonal dishes in the feasts, particularly the desert. Harvest themed songs are sung, along with music and dancing. Along with festivities revolving around the end of the Rainy/Monsoon Season.

 

Borealis activities around Equinox include: A man appointed to stealthily rush with the last corn neck of the harvest to the site of the feast, avoiding a lady appointed to soaked the carrier of the neck if discovered. If the corn carrier is successful then they would be entitled to take a kiss from the appointed lady; Clay doll festival, made with the dredging and de-silting clay from irrigation canals; Eating moon cake, food offerings, Performance of dragon and lion dances, writing riddles on lanterns; Making and carrying lit lanterns through the streets and other public spaces; Glutinous rice flour and rice paste are molded into familiar animals; Courtship dances where young women are encouraged to throw their handkerchiefs to the crowd, and the young man who catches and returns the handkerchief has a chance at romance; Outdoor barbeques for friends, family and public to gather.

 

Australis is celebrating spring, planting and new life.
Australis activities around Equilux include: Watching Puawananga (clematis) blossom and from its blossoming predicting the weather for the coming season. Where if trees flowered on the lower branches first, it would be warm and bountiful, but if they flowered on the upper branches first, it would be cold and unproductive; Begin Kumara planting once the kowhai flowers, and when the star Aotahi (Canopus) is visible in the south sky; Hanging colourful streamers in trees; At dawn, putting up Equilux flags with desires/wishes for the year marked on the flag. Flags from the previous Equilux are taken down the midnight before Equilux dawn and burned at the ceremonial fire on Equilux; Wishing Tree Ties are put up; Nesting bundles put out for birds returning from migrations; Seed starting for gardens; Poi Dancing in public spaces; Egg themed Candies are made and shared; Feather wands made by and for children to play with; Messages in hollows eggs to friends, family, and from secret admirers; Making seed bombs to be tossed in places where new plants are desired to be grown in community; Dying hollow eggs, filling them with wildflower seeds (sealed with tissue paper and wax) and decorating community with resulting eggs. Later having seed egg hunts that is an ongoing game where folks can go off to find them whenever they like. When one is found it is quickly broken on a relation, friend, or even stranger, to wish them well for the coming year – spreading the seeds in the process.

 

BOREALIS

CELEBRATION

GENERAL DATE

SPECIFIC DATE

CALENDAR

REGION OF ORIGIN

CULTURE

Shū-ki (秋季, Autumnal) , Autumnal Equinox Day 秋分の日Shūbun no Hi

September

Equinox, September 22nd

Gregorian calendar

East Asia

Japanese

Equinox

September

Equinox, Anatidae-Anserini 1st, September 22nd

Ehoah Year Wheel – Gavia, Borealis Kalendar

Earth

Saegoah

Mabon, Meán Fómhair, Alban Elfed

September

September 22nd

Gregorian calendar

Wheel of the Year

North Western Europe

Celtic

Golu

September

unknown

unknown

South Asia

Hindu

Gooldize / Goel dheys

September

Equinox, September 22nd

Gregorian calendar

North Western Europe

Cornish

Blessed Rainy Day

September

September 22nd

Tibetan lunar calendar

Southern Asia

Bhutanese

Enkutatash

Early September

Meskerem 1st, September 11th

Ethiopian calendar

East Africa

Ethiopian

Mid-Autumn Festival (中秋節; 中秋节; zhōngqiū jié; Tết Trung Thu)

Late September, Early October

Bāyuè 15th, September 19th

Chinese calendar

East Asia

East Asian

 

AUSTRALIS

CELEBRATION

GENERAL DATE

SPECIFIC DATE

CALENDAR

REGION OF ORIGIN

CULTURE

Ostara

September

September 22nd

Gregorian calendar

Wheel of the Year

North Western Europe

Celtic

Te Koanga, Te Mahuru

September

September 21st/22nd

unknown

Oceania

New Zealand

Equilux

September

Equilux, Anatidae-Tadornin 1st, September 22nd

Ehoah Year Wheel – Sphenisci, Australis Kalendar

Earth

Saegoah

 

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