Festivities of Natural Annual Events Around The World: Borealis Transequilux (Midway Global Solstice & Equinox)

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January 28, 2016 by Rua Lupa

Solterrestriale Vocabulum (Solar-Earth Terms) Brief

What is Seasonally Occurring

During this transition between the Solstice and Equinox the planet’s orbit has the southern hemisphere (Australis) orientated a bit further away from the sun and the northern hemisphere (Borealis) becoming more oriented toward it.

This orientation causes the days in Borealis to be longer, seeing the earth’s daily turning view of the sun higher along the southern horizon; The equatorial regions see the daily turning view of the sun closer to the center of the sky from the south; and the days for Australis are shortening with the daily turning view of the sun becoming lower along the north horizon.

For Australis it is the hottest time of year and the wettest for many regions. Most of the warmer regions would now be experiencing their harvest and/or preparing for a “winter growing season” that is better adapted to colder temperatures and less daylight. Some species begin their migrations north.

For the Tropics, this is when the Tropical Rain Belt is almost at is most southern point in the year.

Original Images by PZmaps, used under Creative Commons.

In the temperate regions south of the Borealis Polus Axis, excluding West and Southern Europe (because of the warm ocean currents in that region of the world), it is the deepest of winter being the coldest time of the year. Around the Borealis Sol Axis, with the addition of Southern & Western Europe, spring is coming into effect with sprouts and flowers becoming visible.

Seasonal Customs

South of the Borealis Polus Axis, with the exclusion of South and Western Europe, a great many communities are hosting winter festivals for this coldest time of year, including activities of snow sculpting, ice fishing, ice skating, sledding, dog sledding, horse/reindeer pulled sleighs, skijoring (dog team, horses, or reindeer pulling a skier) and so on before the snow melts in the following months.

For the warmer climes of Borealis, there is more focus on the coming warmth and light of summer, banishing the dark, cleansing (ritually with fire or through diet or with thorough housecleaning) and celebrating the beginning of spring. Many regions celebrate with brilliant colours, a healthy dose of mischievousness and youthful gaiety in the excitement of spring. As the night still comes early for both climes, there are usually fireworks, bonfires and light displays during or marking the beginning or ending of the festivities. Because of the noticeable increase in day length, along with the coming new growth, many cultures have their new year starting around this time.

In Australis, various regions are having the summer harvest coming in and the winter planting season soon beginning.

BOREALIS

CELEBRATION

GENERAL DATE

SPECIFIC DATE

CALENDAR

REGION OF ORIGIN

CULTURE

Patras Carnival

Late January

17 January until 7th week before first Sunday after the full moon (the Paschal Full Moon) following the northern hemisphere’s vernal equinox.

Gregorian calendar

Southeast Europe

Greek

Sadeh

Late January

50 days before Northward equinox (~March 21)

Zoroastrian calendar

 

Western Asia

Persian

Chahar Shanbeh Suri

Early February

Last Wednesday of the Iranian Calendar year

Zoroastrian calendar

 

Western Asia

Persian

Tu Bishvat

Early February

~296 days after the night of a full moon after the vernal equinox

Hebrew calendar

Western Asia

Hebrew

Imbolc

Early February

1-2 February or nearest full moon to this date or first signs of spring

Gregorian calendar

Celtic calendar

Wheel of the Year

North Western Europe

Celtic

Transequilux

Early February

45 days after winter solstice /45 Days before the Vernal Equinox (Midnight of Feb 3 – Midday Feb 4)

Ehoah Year Wheel – Gavia, Borealis Kalendar

Global

Saegoah

Chūnjié – Chinese New Year, Tet

Early February

When the sun is exactly at the celestial longitude of 315° ending on the 15th day – around February 4 and ends around February 18 (February 19 East Asia time)

Chinese calendar

East Asia

Chinese

Groundhog Day

Early February

Feb 2nd

Gregorian calendar

Central Europe

Pennsylvania Dutch

Lupercalia

Early February

February 13 through 15

Gregorian calendar

Southern Europe

Roman

Maslenitsa

Late February

last week before the 7th week before first Sunday after the full moon (the Paschal Full Moon) following the northern hemisphere’s vernal equinox

Ecclesiastical calendar

Eastern Europe

Eastern Slavic

 

AUSTRALIS

 

CELEBRATION

GENERAL DATE

SPECIFIC DATE

CALENDAR

REGION OF ORIGIN

CULTURE

Lammas Lughnasadh

Early February

February 1st

Gregorian calendar

Celtic calendar

Wheel of the Year

North Western Europe

Celtic

Transequinox

Early February

45 days after summer solstice / 45 days before autumnal equinox

(Midday of Feb 3 – Midnight)

Ehoah Year Wheel – Sphenisci, Australis Kalendar

Global

Saegoah

Te Waru

Early February

2 February

unknown

Oceania

New Zealand / Maori

If anyone knows of other annual celebrations and festivities that reflect the current season that are not in the chart, please post them below – they will also be put in next year’s post.

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